The breakfast habit associated with a '4 times

The lifestyle factors that influence the risk of dementia is key to building buffers against it. A study published in Japanese Journal of Human Sciences of Health-Social Services found a particular breakfast habit was “four times higher” among participants who went on to be diagnosed with dementia.

We use your sign-up to provide content in ways you’ve consented to and to improve our understanding of you. This may include adverts from us and 3rd parties based on our understanding. You can unsubscribe at any time. More infoDementia – a general term for symptoms associated with progressive brain decline – is a common affliction among the elderly. However, it is not a natural result of the ageing process – this is a key insight because suggests there are ways to modify your risk. Over the years researchers have turned their focus to lifestyle factors that are associated with the risk of dementia.

A curious insight came out of a 2011 study published in the Japanese Journal of Human Sciences of Health-Social Services.The purpose of the study was to explore the relationship between lifestyle habits and dementia among community dwelling older adults by conducting a cohort study.The study, conducted over six years, was carried out in a farming community near a major urban centre in Japan.

Dementia: The ‘major’ health factor that could be evident nine years prior to diagnosisA diagnosis of dementia was found to be higher in people who skipped breakfast A diagnosis of dementia was found to be higher in people who skipped breakfast (Image: Getty Images After adjusting for sex and age, researchers found a diagnosis of dementia was “four times higher among participants who did not take breakfast”.

They also found a a diagnosis of dementia was 2.7 times higher among participants who did snack, 2.5 times higher among participants who did not care for salt consumption and 2.7 times higher among participants who did not care for nutrient balance.The researchers concluded: “According to our results, several lifestyle habits were associated with dementia.”Appropriate interventions are required for high-risk individuals, including those with mild cognitive impairment.”

The diet that could play a ‘preventative role’ in the disea It’s important to note that study was limited to a specific cohort and further investigations must be conducted to draw more definitive conclusions.

There’s some evidence that a heart-healthy diet could reduce your risk of developing dementia.Having heart or circulatory disease can raise your risk of dementia, so it makes sense to look after both your heart and your brain,” explains the British Heart Foundation (BHF).The MIND (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay) diet was created by researchers at Rush University in Chicago, to help prevent dementia and slow age-related loss of brain function.

Mediterranean diet shown to bolster the brain against declineThe Mediterranean diet shown to bolster the brain against decline (Image: Getty Images)Six early signs – it can ‘be tricky to spot’It’s a combination of two diets already known to reduce risk of heart and circulatory diseaseThe Mediterranean diet (based on wholegrains, fish, pulses, fruits and vegetables)

The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet. The DASH diet is designed to control blood pressure – a risk factor for heart and circulatory diseases and dementia. It’s similar to the Mediterranean diet, but with a greater emphasis on reducing your salt intake.”Both diets are backed by lots of research showing they can help your heart health, and some evidence to suggest they can contribute to lower levels of mental decline,” says the BHF.The MIND diet names 10 foods linked to improved, or delayed decline in, cognitive function, and five foods to limit.

Source:Express