Researchers Collect Scientific Data For Dove Hunting

Researchers collect data in order to monitor best practices for the Dove hunting season, including season length and bag limits. These measures function as population control, which is the scientific basis for hunting that the PA Game Commission maintains.

Doves are the most abundant game bird in North America, according to the PA Game Commission.

To monitor the life cycles and vast population of the species, doves are regularly banded. A review of Pa. dove research reveals that Pa. mourning doves do not travel beyond their primary geographic area; that is, they live and die in Pa. They sometimes travel only 54 miles in their lifetime, which averages 1.2 years.

Researchers collect data in order to monitor best practices for the Dove hunting season, including season length and bag limits. These measures function as population control, which is the scientific basis for hunting that the PA Game Commission maintains.

Extending science to policy, the Commission describes hunting as a conservation effort, a practice founded to fight deforestation, pollution, and overpopulation.

The PA Game Commission estimates current dove population levels: 350 million doves total; 20 million harvested annually. In Pennsylvania, more than 16,000 hunters participate in dove hunting and generate an annual harvest of more than 100,000.

A statistical outlook on dove hunting situates the hunter as a productive contributor to the practice. Many do not share this view.

On the basis that hunting is an inhumane practice, dove hunting is often contested in a court of law. Michigan, for example, has seen significant resistance from animal rights groups, according to Oakland press reports.

Dove hunting is not legal in select states, including the northeastern states of New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. Overall, 41 U.S. states allow the practice.

State legislatures across the U.S. encounter repeated attempts to ban the practice, even prior to 1988, according to an edition of Field & Stream magazine from that year.

An objective, evidence-based perspective on dove regulation may fail to satisfy both hunters and hunting policy-reform advocates–for the same reason: hunting is often understood as a passion.

In spirit, dove hunting preserves a hunting tradition. In practice, however, the practice was founded in science, is monitored with science, and may support future scientific efforts.

Dove season in Pa. began on Sept. 1, and runs until Nov. 26, with a second round from Dec. 16 to Jan. 1. Hunters may harvest 15 doves daily but are only allowed to possess 45.

Other hunting sessions also began in September. The full list can be found online.

A reminder on Sunday hunting policies: 2021 Sunday hunting dates include Nov. 14, Nov. 21, and Nov. 28. These are the only Sunday hunting dates allowed by law.

Still need to purchase your 2021-22 hunting license.

Source North central Pa

Arsalan Ahmad

Arsalan Ahmad is a Research Engineer working on 2-D Materials, graduated from the Institute of Advanced Materials, Bahaudin Zakariya University Multan, Pakistan. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arsalanahmad-materialsresearchengr/

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