Belarus Claims To Cover 40 Percent Of The Country’s Electricity Needs

Alexander Lukashenko claims that two blocks of the nuclear power plant near Ostrovets will cover 40 percent of the country’s electricity needs.

Alexander Lukashenko claims that two blocks of the nuclear power plant near Ostrovets will cover 40 percent of the country’s electricity needs. Alexander Lukashenko considered the launch of the Belarusian nuclear power plant (BelNPP) near Ostrovets, as a historical moment in the life of Belarus.

The words of the Belarusian ruler during his visit to the station are quoted on Saturday, November 7, by news sources.

“Is the area of the construction and maintenance site larger than the plant itself? I had the impression that it is almost twice as large,” the president said. “Everything is so casual and routine as if we have built the metro. This is a historic moment. The country has become a nuclear power,” the head of state said. He said, referring to the use of a peaceful atom and the connection of the first unit of the nuclear power plant to the unified energy system of the country.

“We have made great progress. We should cooperate with Russia here too,” the president suggested. “As soon as we design our own battery for electric vehicles we will fully switch to electric traction, ahead of other countries.”

Lithuania Sent a Note of Protest to Minsk

As reported by Interfax, the ceremony of increasing the capacity of the first power unit connected to the country’s energy system on November 3 was attended by the State Secretary of the Union State Grigory Rapota, General Director of Rosatom Alexei Likhachev, and Russian Ambassador to Belarus Dmitry Mezentsev. The construction is expected to be completed in 2022.

Meanwhile, Lithuania has already sent a note of protest to Minsk in connection with the connection of the power unit. The document, in particular, condemns the “irresponsible actions” of the Belarusian authorities, which create a “nuclear and environmental threat” not only for Belarus and Lithuania but for Europe as a whole.

Immediately after the launch of the first power unit of the nuclear power plant near Astravets, Lithuania refused to supply electricity from Belarus and called on the rest of the EU to follow its example.

“It is relevant to discuss the 2030 framework program of cooperation [in the CIS – BelTA’s note] in the field of nuclear energy and an action plan to implement its first stage.

Today Belarus, together with its Russian partners, is preparing to launch the first power unit of the Belarusian nuclear power plant.

The construction of the nuclear power plant is a consolidating, creative project that will ensure long-term sustainable development of the country and will strengthen its economic sovereignty,” said Belarus Prime Minister Roman Golovchenko.

Plans to build the first nuclear power plant in Belarus emerged back in 2011, and the actual construction began in 2013. The Belarusian authorities justified the need to launch it by reducing the country’s dependence on hydrocarbons, most of which are imported from Russia.

“All aspects of the national nuclear power program were analyzed. From the very beginning Belarus has done and will continue doing everything necessary to ensure the highest degree of safety of the nuclear power plant with all utmost responsibility,” Belarus prime minister stressed.

Originally published at communal news

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